The care & feeding of immigrant children

The separation of children from their parents at the border has been dominating the news cycle recently. It has resulted in a great deal of exposure of the plight of these children. It’s important to be aware of what goes on inside the brains of children separated from their parents.

Many people are already doing a good job making Americans aware of what these immigrant children are going through. So I found it interesting when a letter from a paramedic at the Texas border revealed another side to the immigration issue. Lee Whitt shined a light on what it’s like for him and his colleagues to care for these children on the border. This letter helped me to recognize that the rank & file at the front line of this crisis should not be thought of in the same light as their leadership in president Trump’s administration:

The issues he raises have been reported in the media but I encourage you to read Whitt’s post anyway because his anecdotes really add important color to the narrative. The media have corroborated that the people working directly with these children are doing a yeoman’s job with the minimal resources they have and under the challenging constraints their leadership have imposed on them. I think Americans should give more recognition to them and the heartbreaking work they’re doing.

I also agree with Whitt’s statement that “I could care less what you think of President Trump but where I draw the line is when we start taking down innocent people and painting them as villains in an effort to destroy someone else.” The irony is that president Trump is the chief person I see taking down innocent people and painting them as villains. His rhetoric explicitly painting immigrants as an infestation of MS-13 gang members, drug dealers, murderers, and rapists is meant to dehumanize immigrants and stoke xenophobia.

So take a minute to look away from Trump’s divisive and heartless actions and recognize the people at the border caring for the immigrant children Trump has detained in their hands.

To be a worker and to be a criminal are not mutually exclusive

Last week, half a million people poured into the streets of LA carrying signs declaring “We’re workers, not criminals” to protest HR 4437.

HR 4437 is a bill being debated in Congress that, if passed, would “amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to strengthen enforcement of the immigration laws, to enhance border security, and for other purposes.” The bill would make it a felony for an immigrant to reside in the USA without the required documentation.

Nonetheless, the undocumented aliens carrying those signs were wrong. A person does not have to be a felon to be a criminal. Even if an illegal alien is only committing a misdemeanor, they’re still by definition a criminal.

Criminal activity should not be rewarded because it only encourages more illegal behavior. Furthermore, as long as there are American citizens going to bed hungry and living without access to healthcare, their taxpayer dollars should not be paid to support other people intentionally breaking the laws of this country.

Undocumented aliens should not be eligible for any government benefits paid for by taxpayer dollars like:

  • Medicare or Medi-Cal
  • housing subsidies
  • AFDC
  • Social Security
  • food stamps
  • welfare

If a child in public schools is not a US citizen or Resident Alien, a surcharge should be levied against the parents to fully cover the expense of educating them. An illegal alien should not be licensed by a state or the federal government to drive, be a contractor, practice healthcare, sell securities or real estate, or any other activity in this country formally sanctioned or regulated by a government entity. If all these restrictions were in place, it would staunch a great deal of illegal immigration. This is a land of limited resources, so our government is obligated to meet all the needs of its citizens first and has no obligation to serve foreign criminals.

Are many illegal immigrants hard working? Sure. Are many of them otherwise law abiding? Yes. Regardless, they could stay in their native countries and work hard and obey the laws there. As soon as they choose to illegally cross our borders, they have intentionally decided to conduct themselves as criminals and should be treated as such. The excuse that they suffer great hardships in their home countries is invalid. If a natural-born US citizen faced hard times and was in great need and chose to rob a bank to relieve his hardships, would you excuse that illegal act? Of course not. Why would we hold illegal immigrants to a lesser standard?

There are complications to dealing with undocumented aliens. Many of them have children that are US citizens, and those children have as much right to a public education as those born to US citizens. These children know nothing of life in their parents’ native country. Many of them are not totally fluent in their parents’ native language. Could you imagine the hardship these children—natural-born American citizens—would suffer trying to adjust to living in a foreign land if their parents were deported? This is but one example of the complexities of the problem.

There are no easy solutions to the problem of illegal immigration. HR 4437 might not be the solution and this post does not purport to have the right answer. Regardless, we cannot move closer to discovering the right solution until we acknowledge the truth that undocumented aliens are breaking the law. Perpetuating a fallacy like an illegal alien who works is not a criminal only serves to cloud our judgment when we address the problem.